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English26/06/2019

DECISION IN CONNECTION WITH ABU HAMZA SENSELESS

 

BANJALUKA, June 26 /SRNA/ - Security expert DŽevad Galijašević says the decision of the European Court of Human Rights ordering BiH to pay 9,000 Euros to Imad al Husin, better known as Abu Hamza, for violations of the European Convention of Human Rights, is senseless, stressing that the Court should have to differentiate between custody and a stay in an immigration center.

 

He says that the European Court of Human Rights does not understand that in BiH, the US and other countries outside the EU it is possible to hold a person who represents a threat to the security of a country which citizenship he does not have for an unlimited amount of time, until the person is extradited to his home country.

“Abu Hamza was not in custody and the European Court of Human Rights should have to differentiate between custody and a stay in an immigration center,” Galijašević told SRNA on Wednesday.

He has said that BiH was extremely tolerant of this radical Islamist and kept him in an immigration center, given that Abu Hamza did not want to be extradited to Syria because of war and did not want to be returned to Croatia, his previous destination.

“The BiH Ministry of Security headed by Dragan Mektić released him from the immigration center by amending the law and adapting it to the EU legislation, namely, by changing a provision on unlimited stay of foreign citizens who pose a threat to the national security in an immigration center,” Galijašević said.

He has said that Abu Hamza had two decrees on BiH citizenship with two different names on them, that both were seized from him and he was stripped of citizenship.

“He is a Syrian national, tied to Islamist circles, one of the main Wahabi chiefs and the last chief the mujahedeen community in BiH. Measures BiH undertook regarding him certainly did not differentiate much from that which western countries, like the US, France, Germany and Austria are doing in a rougher way,” Galijašević said.

According to him, it is absurd to talk about the human rights of persons who pose a threat to the security of BiH and jeopardize human rights of all of its citizens.

“The decision of the European Court of Human Rights is senseless and politicized at the moment when Europe wants to flirt with Salafism and Wahabism in order to fare better in this migrant wave and in everything that is happening in connection with Wahabis and Salafis,” Galijašević said.

The European Court of Human Rights ruled that Abu Hamza’s rights were violated by “the custody in BiH in which he was held from August 2014 until September 2016.”

Abu Hamza was born in Syria and fought on the side of Mujahedeen in the BiH war from 1992 until 1995.

He was put in an immigration center in October 2008, and an order for his deportation was issued in February 2011 when his asylum request was rejected.

In March 2012, a new order for his deportation was issued, but many countries in Europe and the Near East rejected to accept him.

Abu Hamza was released on parole in February 2016. He is banned from leaving his place of residence and is obliged to regularly report to the police station.

Since 2014, BiH has been trying to find a country which would accept Abu Hamza; 38 countries rejected to do it, and he had to be released since the longest allowed duration of custody expired.

At the moment, he lives in Ilidža, in Sarajevo Canton. /end/sg